Coco Chanel
Coco Chanel

Most of us (women) have  umbilical-like bond with our hair. Our hair is a physical manifestation of the internal conversations we have with ourselves. Many times the state of our hair –  whether purchased or home grown – also serves as a barometer of our internal disposition. Note the statement ‘bad hair day’. For the uninitiated a bad hair day is just one of those days that try as you may your hair never sits quite right even in the face of a dozen hair products (both imported and concocted by your local Rastafarian). Needless to say hair is important to us women.

Amazing short hair courtesy of zimbablog.com
Amazing short hair courtesy of zimbablog.com

Truth is for many of us our hair is our crowning glory. It is our greatest accessory, our loudest statement to the world. Whether you have the latest Brazilian weave, a clean shaved head, a meticulously styled dreadlock or one that falls off like a mop each one tells a silent story of who we are to the world. I got my dreadlocks done on the 29th of January 2010. I had always wanted dreadlocks I believe my internal self was born with a twisted mop and was waiting for me to get with the program all my life. Coming from a conservative Christian home I had to take my time before going for a look that was considered a rebellious deviation for a preacher’s daughter. And so I waited until I got older, got the degree, got the job, basically until it was safely independent to get them done. O man! I was so happy when I did. getting dreadlocks marked a significant time in my life and career. Many changes happened in the 201-2011 period that just tied in so well with the changed hair do. Looking back now I realise that my internal conversations had changed and so my outlook changed also.

So why cut my hair now if they’re symbolic of such a transition? For that exact same fact. Sometimes in order to embrace the new we have to be willing to let go of the old or the familiar. So yes – Coco was right. Changes is on the horizon, I am ready to make it. Did I have to sacrifice my crowning glory just to make that point —Yes! Most women will change their look and hair an average of two or three times in their lifetime. And each time will be symbolic of the phase they are in. Once again my internal conversation has changed and my outlook has to also. This is my corporeal act that is constructing of change (to borrow from Butler).

Five years ago I got dreadlocks, I love them, I nourished them; they pointed to a bold new era I was entering. Now I cut them off because that time has ended and a bolder new era awaits. Here’s to the next 5 years!

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